Adjectives: Develop your Description! *Freebie*

From the first grade, we should be expecting that our students use frequently occurring adjectives in their language (Common Core Standard L.1.1f, L.2.1e).

I have made a great visual scaffold for describing. It prompts the child to think of adjectives by the different attribute that it describes. These categories will help the child expand their language, deepen their semantic association and increase their sentence length and structure. Just hand the ‘Describe Me!’ bookmark to your child for a visual support and start your therapy.

 Screen Shot 2016-08-02 at 9.43.19 AMFree Download from my TPT store

There are 2 bookmarks on each page; one outlining the different types of adjectives and the other listing several adjectives activities that you can use to get your describing ideas flowing. If you want to find a place of all my FREE resources, follow my Pinterest page for the latest updates.

WHO SHOULD USE THESE?

  • SLPs: A great scaffold for all SLPs to use! I have a bunch of these that I give to my students and their parents so that we are all working together. School-based SLPs are encouraged to use their child’s curriculum themes and unit materials with the adjectives scaffolds.
  • KIDS: I give all the students who I work with these bookmarks. They use them in the classroom, for homework and with me in therapy. A great prompt and support!
  • TEACHERS: All students would benefit from this support. A great tool to use when teaching adjectives in the classroom – and you could easily adapt the ‘activities’ to make the whole class involved!
  • PARENTS: You don’t have to be an expert in language to try to increase your child’s vocabulary and adjective use. Follow the ‘activities’ bookmark for ideas to transfer these skills to the home environment.
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Hi, I'm Rebecca.
I encourage SLPs to feel more confident treating speech sound disorders, and make faster progress with their students.

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